Viagra sales

More than $400 million worth of Viagra was sold in its
first quarter on the U.S. market; in the week of 8 May 1998—one
month after launch—more than 300,000 total prescriptions were
written for Viagra.

Since then Pfizer has maintained a list price of $7 per tablet. Viagra is substantially less expensive than its pharmaceutical competitors: Muse, the transurethral suppository, and Caverject, the penile injection.

Viagra has an average wholesale price of $8.75 per pill, while, on the same basis, Caverject and Muse are priced at $20–$30 per treatment.

Prescriptions peaked and leveled off in the quarters following Viagra’s launch. One reason was the information men gained by trying the drug. Some discovered that Viagra was not effective for them. Others, who did not actually suffer from ED but who (with a doctor’s authorization) had tried it anyway, confirmed that Viagra would not confer exaggerated sexual prowess.viagra store

In addition, use may have been limited by increased public awareness focused on the cardiovascular safety issues in men taking Viagra, particularly on the deaths and serious adverse events that were reported to the FDA.

However, no causal link has been established between Viagra and the reports of death, and the FDA “continues to believe Viagra is safe and effective if used according to the updated labeling.” European registration was granted by the European Medicines
Evaluation Agency (EMEA) in September 1998, and sales began in most European countries shortly thereafter.

Only in Sweden, the Republic of Ireland, and, for limited uses, the United Kingdom does the government health system cover purchases of Viagra.

In most countries sales have shown some leveling off after an initial peak, as was the U.S. experience. Approvals and launches in Latin America followed shortly after the drug’s approval and launch in the United States, and Viagra is now available in a number of Asian countries, Australia, New Zealand, and Canada. Japan’s approval, in January 1999, was unprecedented in two respects.

First, the six-month approval was the most rapid Japanese approval ever. Second, for the first time Japan accepted data from clinical trials conducted elsewhere.

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